Spaced Out Limited

 
Address   Spaced Out Limited
Flexitron Studio
4a Godson Street
London
N1 9GZ 
 
   020 7833 9236   
Email   james@spacedout.co.uk  
Website   www.spacedout.co.uk 
Contact   Mr James David Engel 

 Further information >>
 
1: Project NameInfinity House
Dates: 2012 - 2016
Location: London 
Gross Area: 500 to 999 sqm 
Sectors:
Conservation - Georgian Buildings,  Houses and Housing - Conversion & Extensions,  Houses and Housing - General,  Houses and Housing - One-off Houses
 
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Key Services:
Art & Architecture,  Conservation & Restoration,  Full Architectural Service,  Interior Design,  Refurbishment
 
Description:
In the thick of Clerkenwells variety of styles, scales and uses, Infinity House is an extraordinary family dwelling that has been miraculously carved out from a very constrained site. The detail design solution delivers a haven of privacy, facility and joy. The result is a design led rejuvenation project that substantially extends an 18th century Georgian Townhouse following the demolition of a 20th century industrial workshop that covered the original garden. The sanctuary and classic section of the Georgian townhouse has been seamlessly linked vertically and horizontally to new spaces. Soft reflections and floating details deliver magical transitions between old, new and nature. The structured planting of the sky gardens is visible from all the main spaces. Natural light is brought into all levels by extensive roof and floor glazing that lights the basement swimming pool, spa and ground floor. Reflections widen an elongated site, forming an illusion of infinite space. Lateral views, not provided by a terraced property, are developed with parallel and offset glazed materials applied to the party walls and emphasised with an internal and an external courtyard at the junction between the new and the old architectures. Infinity unfolds as light pours over, reflects within and is either recycled or absorbed by a variety of surfaces. There are numerous special moments, great spaces and details for which no amount of words can adequately explain the magic.
 
2: Project NameSylvan Glade
Dates: 2010 - 2011
Location: Keston Park, Kent 
Gross Area: Not available 
Sectors:
Houses and Housing - General,  Houses and Housing - One-off Houses,  Landscaping - Gardens
 
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Key Services:
Art & Architecture,  CAD Services,  Design & Build
 
Description:
Situated within the mature landscape of Keston Park, the new Sylvan Glade, which replaces it’s 1940’s predecessor, quietly celebrates it’s form within an informal landscape. This landscape is an integral aspect of the aesthetic conception. The brief from the client was to create a fluid family house with a better relationship to light and landscape than the original house they had lived in on the location for 20 years. Consideration was directed towards life cycle living for themselves, the specific needs of grandma (nearly 90) and their own children and new grandchild. A modern house comprising of the usual elements of glass screening and open space transcends the predictable, exploiting every ray of daylight, orientating each room to specific views, charged by the cycle of each day. Spaces are tuned with soft curving walls to capture the light and promote the play of shadows generated by the mature trees. It is an inside out house. Within it’s setting of typical ‘Chocolate Box’ English Houses, the new house creates a thematic tension that on closer inspection is spatially generous. Reflections of the neighbouring architecture merge, opening up new relationships. A dialogue that the Local Council were initially not so sure should exist. The enthusiasm from the neighbouring community for the adventurous couple whose children had grown up there made it a planning possibility. Although previous schemes had been contentious, the final proposal was viewed as a sympathetic work of Architecture. The Architect's extraordinary vision secured planning approval from the Keston Park Estate Planning Committee and the London Borough of Bromley. Both without compromise. Delivered to a fixed budget, there was no compromise on the specification of efficient technology. The plan forms were simplified, whilst the enclosure stepped-up to use for the first time in a English House, a curtain wall of heat mirror ‘southwall’ tripled glazing, front and back. The hidden secret is that both flank walls have only 3% glazed area, even though the overriding memory is of a predominantly glass house. Spaced Out engaged the Client to make the project their own by involving them not only in the overall design process, which is essential, but in the selection of materials. They were also delighted to be the first to use innovative new products including Heat Mirror Film within their glazing. This innovative new technology allows users to experience all the health and well being benefits of natural light, whilst minimizing heat loss through the glass. The transparent film is stretched within the void of otherwise standard double glazed units , forming a lightweight and highly efficient triple glazing. This provides a 0.6w/m2/k U value and also prevents the house from overheating in the summer months. An internal structural steel frame is combined with eco-joists for the subtle 8 degree pitched roof. Floor plates are formed with precast concrete beams , infilled with concrete block and screed. The floor plates provide the required thermal mass , which in turn supports the inclusion of the water based underfloor heating system. Secondary framed structures are full depth insulated timber frames. All part of a hybrid construction system selected after considerable research into the use of other methods and systems, which focused on cross laminated timber structures and prefabricated timber cassettes. Combined with a whole house mechanical ventilation heat recovery system, and using the thermal mass of the beam and block slabs, Sylvan Glade is an efficient solution when employing large areas of glass.
 
3: Project NameArt Studio and Community Space at Drayton Park Primary School
Dates: 2012 - 2013
Location: London 
Gross Area: 100 to 249 sqm 
Sectors:
Culture & Entertainment - Community Centres,  Education - General,  Education - Primary Education
 
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Key Services:
Architects' Service & Fee Advice,  Art & Architecture,  Community Development
 
Description:
This new Art Studio and Community Space at Drayton Park Primary School provides an inclusive facility for parents, pupils and the wider community. This proposal provides new teaching spaces, pre and after school facilities, a flexible Community room and new play spaces. The design offers flexibility of use for cross disciplinary knowledge exchange and skills development for all the children of the School. The provision of the Community Room offers parallel activities that can be independently scheduled or integral to the School agenda. The design seeks to resolve the needs of the School and the wider Community with a building that both visually and spatial represents it£s purpose. The design philosophy includes stages of distillation. Taking care to collate all views raised during the early consultation phases and the more formal design presentations. The Head Teacher and the School Governors have worked tirelessly to open-up £best£ channels of communication with the School and the local Community. With resounding success this process has reinforced the concept designs and focused the creation of the scheme that is now being constructed on site. The art studio in part cantilevers over the playground to minimise any loss of playground space. This creates a covered play area and a place for safe play on and adjacent to the lifeboat. The roof form of the art room is derived from attaining the best possible natural £flat£ northern light. This helps to minimises energy usage. The symbolic use of a traditional pitched roof house, so often used by children to represent a home, defines the Community Room. The weatherboard cladding links the Architecture to boat houses and the almost entirely lost grain of pre-georgian London The requirement for flexibile of use patterns penetrated not only the layout but also the in-use management of the building. As a result the building is independantly heated and secured without compromise to the existing school facilities. It's location as an annex to the main school buildings is purposeful. Access is gained from the playground and/or directly from Arvon Road. The Lifeboat, the William Henry & Mary King has become the School's brand symbol since it's arrival after retirement from Bridlington over 20 years ago. To make way for the new building the lifeboats location and support structure needed to be changed. As a result of workshops with the pupils, staff and parents a decision to lower the boat into a pocket within the playground was approved by the Govenors.
 
4: Project NameSettles Street Mews
Dates: 2004 - 2007
Location: London 
Gross Area: 500 to 999 sqm 
Sectors:
Houses and Housing - General
 
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Key Services:
Architects' Service & Fee Advice,  Art & Architecture,  CAD Services
 
Description:
The creation of a new mews on an old industrial site in the heart of london. Close to the central business districts of the City and Canary wharf, this project provides high quality housing within a culturally rich and historically colourful part of London. The Architecture has been driven by the desire to create light and airy spaces combined with privacy, essential to healthy urban living. This has formed a very exciting series of volumes and external spaces. The bold geometric facade, shifting and opening to encourage light penetration and provide privacy is balanced and softened with the use of an inspired colour palette. Colours chosen are commonly found in reclaimed London Stock bricks. Here the painted surfaces are on the Bay faces, cranked open from the primary elevation. The rendered screens are fully enclosed at ground floor level with sheltered balconies at first floor level. The Architecture forms a new terrace, with 5 Houses and 6 apartment blocks, seamlessly united under one roofline. All units enjoy private terraces, balconies and a shared cobbled entrance court. The Mews is gated for added security and privacy.
 
5: Project NameSt. Barnabas
Dates: 2002 - 2003
Location: Cambridge 
Gross Area: 100 to 249 sqm 
Sectors:
Houses and Housing - Conversion & Extensions
 
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Key Services:
Art & Architecture,  Interior Design,  Refurbishment
 
Description:
St Barnabas is the remodelling and extension to a large family house. During the briefing phase it became clear that we were to focus our energy on resolving how the house and garden could be best joined. The existing house is an Edwardian semi-detached Villa which had an isolated back living room that totally under played the potential of it's relationship to the long west facing walled garden. Spaced out reacted to this brief by creating a lightweight garden room, opening up the back of the house. With a relatively small scale extension we fulfilled the idea that we should design a space that is manageable, with everything in easy reach. A space that never feels empty The design was driven by our desire to extend the property in a sensitive manner with seamless detailing. The result is an object that gently slides in under the building, retaining the upper level part of the original full length bay window.
 
6: Project NameWeave House, Shacklewell Lane
Dates: 2006 - 2008
Location: London 
Gross Area: 500 to 999 sqm 
Sectors:
Houses and Housing - General
 
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Key Services:
Architects' Service & Fee Advice,  Art & Architecture,  CAD Services
 
Description:
Dalston is a rapidly evolving central urban suburb. The Site is flanked by studio workshops , a halel superstore and a mosque, formally a synagogue. The area has a dynamic mixture that makes up this special community. Currently the dominant immigrants being from the Caribbean, Africa and Turkey. The area has dramatically transformed since the Jewish Community started to move-on in the early 1970s. Dalston is soon to be connected to the City by a new Monorail. Travel times to the Stock Exchange will be reduced from 35mins to 12 mins . This area is likely to change once again. The design responds to the shifting qualities of the area with a South Street elevation that has a range of coloured sliding screens that merge and diverge on a regular basis.
 
7: Project NameKanada Ya, Panton Street
Dates: 2015
Location: London 
Gross Area: Not available 
Sectors:
Food and Beverage - Restaurants
 
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Key Services:
Art & Architecture,  Furniture Design,  Interior Design,  Refurbishment
 
Description:
In the heart of London's West End close to Piccadilly Circus, at 3 Panton Street, this once dated basement and ground floor french restaurant has been transformed into a unique Japanese ramen restaurant. The transformation is the second Kanada-Ya restaurant in London. Two others are overseas, one in Japan and one on Hong Kong Island. The client brief was to develop themes from their original London restaurant in St Giles, by Haruhito Tomi with Spaced Out to cement the Kanada – Ya brand in London. As found the space was dark and in need of complete renovation. This provided many design and detail challenges. The result of Spaced Out's close collaboration with the clients incorporates a skyscape of round ceiling mirrors set at angles to reveal interesting pockets of extended vision for the customers. This feature alone makes the most of the details within the space. High level clerestory mirrors widen and extend the basement space, positioned strategically under the traditional london pavement lenses. The use of round pendant lights, in a variety of sizes and textures, interspersed with the skyscape adds to the dynamics of the space. Reflections of the furniture, occupants and the lighting provides a buzz to the whole composition. The Kanada-Ya brand logo, featuring Mr Kanada-Ya provided the inspiration for the colour pallet, predominantly using black, white and flashes of red as the 'secret colour'. The original structural brickwork of the space has been beautifully sandblasted and cleaned and combined with natural Douglas Fir timber furniture, injects a natural feel into the more formal colour pallet. The final materials palette creates a comfortable composition. The use of cross laminated douglas fir, by Tilly, is used to form, stools, benches and the round booths. Composed of 3 solid layers of douglas fir, this material has a very graphical as well as natural weave to its cut faces. This is expressed on the furniture as well as the vertically banded screen to the staircase. The douglas fir wood has been treated with a white hard wax oil to provide a silk like finish and added durability. All the furniture and fittings are designed by Spaced Out and fabricated by an Artist / Maker , the Bamber Brothers of Hackney. The leg profile of the stools reflects the profile of the booth backs , a typical inflection often found in Japanese and other oriental furniture. Whereas, back to back, the booths create an elegant diamond graphic, filled with a flash of the secret colour, red. The variability of form found in chop sticks inspired the staircase screen. Note that each element is paired and that lengths and thicknesses vary based on our research. These quiet but effective references add to the authenticity of the final design language nurtured by Spaced Out.
 
8: Project NameThatched House
Dates: 2004 - 2006
Location: London 
Gross Area: 250 to 499 sqm 
Sectors:
Houses and Housing - General
 
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Key Services:
Architects' Service & Fee Advice,  Art & Architecture,  CAD Services
 
Description:
Thatched House is a new build residential development in Leyton, located on a former car park site next to a public house that has been on the site since the 17th Century. Two barns collide and capture three interlocking townhouses and three apartments. The Thatched House Pub is a local Landmark. An institution, known for its specific culture rather than its Architecture. The key focus of the Planners was to minimise the impact of the new building on the Pub. Spaced Out has designed two volumes, two offset pitched roof barns which subtly respond to the dominant double pitched rear elevation of the Public House. The new volumes continue rather than break with the existing landmark, aligning the roof pitch, ridge and eaves levels. Within the two main volumes you find six private units, woven together with a variety of access points and plans arranged over stepped sections. All the units have been designed to provide spatial diversity which we believe enhances individuality. The space occupied by the staircase is the resultant space from the merging of the two volumes. This space has a dramatic resultant geometry, reinforced by only having a skylight slot.
 
9: Project NamePenderyn Whisky Distillery Visitor Centre
Dates: 2006 - 2008
Location: Brecon Beacons, Powys 
Gross Area: 250 to 499 sqm 
Sectors:
Culture & Entertainment - Visitors' Centres
 
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Key Services:
Art & Architecture,  CAD Services
 
Awards:
2009 RIBA Wales Award Winner
Description:
Officially opened in June 2008 by HRH The Prince of Wales, the 850,000 visitor centre for Penderyn Whisky has experienced a steady stream of visitors wishing to visit one of the very few independently owned distillerries in the UK. The centre is housed in one of the sites existing buildings, which has been reclad in black stained, whaney edged, sawn oak panels, giving it a unique presence in the landscape. In line with the whisky itself, the visitor centre is deliberately understated and expresses a beautiful handcrafted quality. The centre offers views into the still, bottling area and cooperage store, whilst using barrels to act as space dividers, which guide visitors from the double height entrance lobby to a tasting bar made of black slate with a glass inlay. Winner of 2009 RIBA Award (David Archer Architects with Spaced Out Architecture Studio)
 
10: Project NameTown Parks Farm Eco-Tourism Estate
Dates: 2006 - (ongoing)
Location: Collaton St. Mary 
Gross Area: 5 000 to 9 999 sqm 
Sectors:
Agriculture - Estate Planning,  Agriculture - General,  Community Participation,  Houses and Housing - General
 
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Key Services:
Architects' Service & Fee Advice,  Art & Architecture,  CAD Services,  Computer Graphics
 
Description:
Close to the beautiful and holistic inland transition town of Totnes in South Devon and with views to the ocean over Collaton St. Mary in the Torbay. This new Eco-Tourism Estate will consist of a Farmstead Complex, Lodges, family Linhay, a Health Spa, a Market Garden providing produce for the Estate, Outdoor Tennis Courts with support facilities, Indoor Sports Hall, Staff Accommodation, 2 Management Residences, Livery only Stables, Extended Cycle Route, Wetland Wildlife Area, Major Landscape and Habitat enhancement, Managed Woodland, Sculpture Trail in new Woodland, Ancillary Buildings & Infrastructure. All the Architecture, including over 60 Lodges will be carbon neutral. Materials, whenever possible will be locally sourced. Designed by Spaced Out Architecture Studio 2009 (Design and model by spaced out architecture studio, rendering courtesy of Clustaspace)